California State Bar Task Force Identifies 16 Options to Significantly Change the Practice of Law

While attending a BASF reception event this past Friday evening I introduced myself to two attorney attendees who were already engaged in a discussion. I did not know either of the two attorneys. As it turns out, the discussion was about a topic that I had heard nothing about – a California State Bar Task Force evaluating and apparently recommending changes – significant changes – to the practice of law. Occasionally I post discussions about the practice of law in this blog or in my other blog (trust estate litigation: http://californiaestatetrust.com), including, for example, somewhat recent posts about rule of professional responsibility changes pertaining to conflicts of interest, confidentiality, and attorney as a witness rules.

One of the attorneys from this past Friday evening emailed some additional information to me about the State Bar Task Force. The materials, and the possible changes that are being evaluated are detailed and significant, including, for example, options for expanding the practice of law by non-attorneys and business entities that are not law firms, allowing non-attorney ownership of law firms, changing confidentiality and conflict rules, changing limitations on the sharing of fees with non-lawyers, and more.

Frankly, it would take me considerable time to evaluate the possible changes, of which it appears that there are or could be 16 options that are proposed. Thus, for your additional information and reading, below I have provided links to some of the Task Force materials.

The following is part of the State Bar’s description of the Task Force’s assignment: The State Bar Board appointed a Task Force on Access Through Innovation of Legal Services (ATILS) and assigned it to identify possible regulatory changes to remove barriers to innovation in the delivery of legal services by lawyers and others. ATILS was charged with balancing dual goals: consumer protection and increased access to legal services. ATILS has developed 16 concept options for possible regulatory changes, and the Task Force is now seeking public input to help evaluate these ideas.

The following is a Task Force chart that broadly illustrates areas of possible change. Note that this chart does not list or illustrate the individual options that are being considered – also note that if the chart is somewhat difficult to read in this format you will also find a version of the chart by clicking on the Options for Regulatory Reform link below:

The following is a link to a rather long pdf report by the Task Force – I note that the report description indicates “Tentative Recommendations,” indicating or suggesting that although hearings are ongoing the Task Force appears to have already reached tentative recommendations: Board of Trustees Agenda Item 701 JULY 2019: State Bar Task Force on Access Through Innovation of Legal Services Report: Request to Circulate Tentative Recommendations for Public Comment

The following is a link to the Task Force’s website with the heading: Options for Regulatory Reform: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/About-Us/Our-Mission/Protecting-the-Public/Public-Comment/Public-Comment-Archives/2019-Public-Comment/Options-for-Regulatory-Reforms-to-Promote-Access-to-Justice

The following is a link to the Task Force’s primary website: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/About-Us/Who-We-Are/Committees-Commissions/Task-Force-on-Access-Through-Innovation-of-Legal-Services/Task-Force-on-Access-Through-Innovation-of-Legal-Services

These Task Force materials are important for all attorneys, prospective attorneys, law schools, and providers or potential providers of legal services. Currently I have no insight as to which if any changes will be made; however, I am sure that more on these topics will follow.

—————————————————————

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

 

Forwarding from The FCPA Blog – “Yes, ‘ethical culture’ can be measured” or audited – and so can governance, risk management, compliance, and almost everything, etc. . . .

I am forwarding a July 22, 2019, post by Vera Cherepanova on the FCPA Blog – the following is the link to Ms. Cherepanova’s post: http://www.fcpablog.com/blog/2019/7/22/yes-ethical-culture-can-be-measured.html

Ms. Cherepanova highlights the recent Department of Justice update to its “Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs,” and also references the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines, noting that both in part refer to the importance “for a company to create and foster a culture of ethics and compliance.” She then queries: “But how does a company measure its culture of compliance, and what steps does it take in response to its measurement of the compliance culture?” Responding to her query, Ms. Cherepanova states, “Although they sometimes may be labeled differently, the key five you would want to incorporate [into] your measurement include the following: Achievability of targets, goals, and tasks . . . Communication . . . Leadership . . . Organizational justice . . . [and] Accountability.”

I view the blog post as discussing at least two issues: “yes, ethical culture can be measured,” and “criteria that might be used to measure ethical culture.” My response to the first issue also is “yes.” In fact, ethical culture not only can be measured, but can also be audited, such as by internal audit or outside audit. Related to culture, tone-at-the-top and internal controls and control processes have long been recognized as elements in an audit at least from the standpoint of evaluating the possibility of fraud and the extent to which records can be relied upon in designing the audit. Almost anything can be audited including, for example, not just financial transactions but also governance, risk management or risk management processes, compliance with laws, and the list is almost endless.

The more challenging issue is what criteria to use to measure or audit ethical culture and other areas? And, of course, there are follow up issues such as determining who will actually perform and evaluate the measurement or audit process, and will the task of establishing ethical culture not only involve management but also oversight by the board, or the audit committee, or a separate risk committee? Guidelines require board and/or board committee oversight. Relevant to these issues, also click on the following link for a May 2019 post that I wrote about the new DOJ guidelines https://wp.me/p75iWX-fc

Ms. Cherepanova lists some good key areas to measure or audit. It is possible to add additional key areas, and additional criteria can be added to the five areas that the blog post identifies. I’m not being critical of the five key areas that are listed, instead, I am merely pointing out that there is lack of agreement on the key areas to include in the measurement or audit process. Certainly at least DOJ and court case guidance should be consulted. It should also be added, for example, the establishment of a robust anonymous reporting process, and related investigation processes. In addition to others, you should also consult legal counsel for additional guidance. Consider using a team approach as these topics can require input from attorneys and other professionals who have backgrounds in a multitude of different areas.

Ms. Cherepanova’s post raises many additional issues, in fact too many to cover in this post. Under Leadership and Accountability, for example, does or will the alleged wrongdoer’s stature or status within the organization impact the investigation and/or the resulting discipline, if any? These can be difficult questions. Whereas one might argue that stature or status should not be relevant criteria, the severity of disciplinary measures can both positively and negatively impact an organization when a key member of the organization is involved.

My view has been and remains that organizational culture and ethical culture are here to stay as significant or at least relevant organizational issues.

—————————————————————

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

New July 11, 2019, PCAOB CAM Guidance For Audit Committees – Is A Matter A CAM (See Chart); And Responses To FAQs

On July 11, 2019, the PCAOB published additional guidance for audit committees about CAMs (Critical Audit Matters). I have provided a link below to the additional guidance. From the additional guidance, I am also providing immediately below a snapshot to the PCAOB’s chart to help determine whether a matter is a CAM, plus four of the PCAOB’s responses to frequently asked questions that I found interesting. This is my fourth relatively recent post in which I have commented about CAMs.

Immediately below is a snapshot to the PCAOB’s chart to determine whether a matter is a CAM:

The following are snapshots of four of the PCAOB’s responses to frequently asked questions that I found to be interesting. While the responses are useful and helpful, I don’t find that they simplify the matter. The response in the first snapshot below also could be confusing – I expect that audit committees will want to have a significant role in, or at least significant input in or comments about, CAMs and certain specific CAMs and proposed CAMs in particular. Whereas the auditor might have ultimate say about how a CAM is worded (because it is the auditor’s report), I expect that audit committees will be directly involved in and vocal about whether or not a matter is a CAM, and how the CAM is communicated. And I expect that in some circumstances there might be or will be disagreement, at which point the audit committee, or the board, or the company might be put the position of having to evaluate whether to communicate or respond further about the CAM, and the manner of doing so.

The following are snapshots of four of the PCAOB’s responses to frequently asked questions that I found to be interesting:

Click on the following link to be taken to the PCAOB’s page with the new July 11, 2019, PCAOB guidance for audit committees about CAMs:

https://pcaobus.org/Documents/Audit-Committee-Resource-CAMs.pdf

—————————————————————

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

Ethical Lapses, Illegal Actions, And Corporate Governance – What Should A Board And Business Do – Forwarding Post By Scott Wornow – Chocked-Full Of Helpful Information

I am forwarding a timely and helpful discussion by Scott Wornow of the Coblentz firm in which Scott discusses situations that we now regularly see in the multi-media social, business and political news: issues and situations to consider when an executive, or the business, or a high-profile person who is associated with or linked to the business is accused of a significant unethical or illegal act or lapse of judgment. Below I have provided a link to Scott’s discussion, and I have also provided a few snapshots from Scott’s discussion. Headings contained in Scott’s discussion include, for example, topics covering Contracts and Quasi-Contracts; Morals Clauses; Fiduciary Considerations; and Regulatory; Compliance and Risk Management. Scott’s discussion covers a lot of issues in a concise and to-the-point discussion. This is a discussion that is important for all businesses including public companies, nonprofits and NGOs, private companies, and even governmental entities.

These issues can cross into many different areas including law, liability and remedial actions, social and business reputation, crisis management, investigations, internal controls, governance and leadership, “righting the ship,” culture, HR and tone at the top, enterprise risk management (ERM) processes and who has responsibility for risk management, compliance policies and processes, protecting the business’s assets pre- and post-crisis, ESG, boards and audit and risk committees, the FCPA, the new DOJ guidelines on corporate compliance programs, internal and outside audit, executive officers, directors, senior managerial officers and other professionals, and in-house counsel responsibilities and possible liability, dealing with regulatory agencies, and other areas. Also consider whether the industry in which the business operates is subject to additional specific statutes, regulations, rules, or expectations that are relevant to these topics. You will find discussions on many of these topics throughout this blog.

The following are some snapshots from Scott’s discussion (I added the yellow highlights), and below the snapshots I have provided a direct link to Scott’s full discussion.

Click on the following link to access Scott’s full discussion.

Ethical Lapses, Illegal Actions, and Corporate Governance

—————————————————————

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

Forwarding from Scott Lenet – Venture Capital Desperately Needs More Governance

I am forwarding a link to a discussion by Scott Lenet about venture capital desperately needing more governance. I have also provided below a screenshot from part of Scott’s article. And I note of interest that Scott makes a reference to the NACD’s new Directorship Certification program which is starting soon. Here is a link to Scott’s article:  Click Here For The Article

And here is a screenshot to part of Scott’s article:

—————————————————-

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

If California Government, Nonprofits, And Education Are Leaders In ERM, Governance, And ESG, Others Will Follow

I ask, what would happen if California government, nonprofits, and education adopted, implemented, and embraced in their operations ERM (enterprise risk management), governance, and ESG (environment, social, and governance) practices, and openly discussed and disclosed their practices? People would notice and follow. For the purpose of this discussion I have noted California government, nonprofits, and education because it seems that at times or for certain issues people who are involved in these activities or positions already are concerned about or are interested in ERM, governance, and ESG. Waiting for public and private businesses, and possibly their auditors, to be induced or possibly compelled into these practices by statute, regulation, or rule is not the only option. Lead and others will follow. For example, we already have criteria or standards for:

– Risk management and ERM (consider as guidance, e.g., materials from COSO (the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission); ISO (the International Organization for Standardization); and other guidance, etc.);

– ESG (consider as guidance, e.g., materials from the SASB (Sustainability Accounting Standards Board); and other guidance, etc.); and

– Governance (consider as guidance, e.g., the above guidance; applicable statutes, regulations and rules; court case precedence; the business judgment rule; and materials from the SEC and the stock exchanges; and other guidance, etc.).

The opportunities and the solutions to move these practices forward already currently are and have been at-hand – California (elected offices and representatives, and departments), nonprofits, and education can lead by example, and others will follow. See also below re ERM and COSO, audit committees, and investigations. Dave Tate, Esq. (and California CPA, inactive). San Francisco and California.

—————————————————-

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *

D&O Compass/ISS – Trends in Director Skill Sets – Starting to Include culture/HR, CSR or ESG . . . Non-Financial Skills

I found the following interesting from D&O Compass, as reported by Institutional Shareholder Services, Inc. – perhaps desired director skill sets are including or starting to include culture or HR, corporate social responsibility or ESG, and other non-financial skills and backgrounds.

But I am a bit curious about one of the comments: “. . . there is an ongoing director-level shift away from ‘traditional’ skills such as financial expertise, audit expertise, and CEO experience.” I would argue, however, that financial expertise, audit expertise, and CEO experience also can relate and be pertinent to culture or HR, corporate social responsibility, and ESG.

In fact, as you might know from my other posts and materials, it is not uncommon for the audit committee to be delegated initial risk management oversight (although in my view overall oversight of risk management remains as a board responsibility), and it has been my view that culture, corporate social responsibility and ESG, including governance, offer potential opportunities for internal audit and external audit to provide new and enhanced value-added services that could be helpful to management including executive management, the board, and audit or risk committees, and that those services could also benefit the organization as a whole and the shareholders. Please excuse the less-than-fantastic quality of the D&O Compass materials, as that was the best that could be done. Best to you, David Tate, Esq., San Francisco/California.

———————————————

Remember, every case and situation is different. It is important to obtain and evaluate all of the evidence that is available, and to apply that evidence to the applicable standards and laws. You do need to consult with an attorney and other professionals about your particular situation. This post is not a solicitation for legal or other services inside of or outside of California, and, of course, this post only is a summary of information that changes from time to time, and does not apply to any particular situation or to your specific situation. So . . . you cannot rely on this post for your situation or as legal or other professional advice or representation.

Thank you for reading this website. I ask that you also pass it along to other people who would be interested as it is through collaboration that great things and success occur more quickly.

Best to you, David Tate, Esq. (and inactive California CPA) – practicing in California only.

I am also the new Chair of the Business Law Section of the Bar Association of San Francisco.

Blogs: Trust, estate/probate, power of attorney, conservatorship, elder and dependent adult abuse, nursing home and care, disability, discrimination, personal injury, responsibilities and rights, and other related litigation, and contentious administrations http://californiaestatetrust.com; Business, D&O, board, director, audit committee, shareholder, founder, owner, and investor litigation, governance, responsibilities and rights, compliance, investigations, and risk management  http://auditcommitteeupdate.com

The following are copies of the tables of contents of three of the more formal materials that I have written over the years about accounting/auditing, audit committees, and related legal topics – Accounting and Its Legal Implications was my first formal effort, which resulted in a published book that had more of an accounting and auditing focus; Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, for the California Continuing Education of the Bar has a more legal focus; and the most recent Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide (February 2017) also has a more legal focus:

Accounting and Its Legal Implications

Chapter 5A, Audit Committee Functions and Responsibilities, CEB Advising and Defending Corporate Directors and Officers

Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide

The following are other summary materials that you might find useful:

OVERVIEW OF A RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS THAT YOU CAN USE 03162018

Audit Committee 5 Lines of Success, Diligence, and Defense - David Tate, Esq, 05052018

COSO Enterprise Risk Management Framework ERM Components and Principles

From a prior blog post which you can find at https://wp.me/p75iWX-dk if the below scan is too difficult to read:

* * * * *