Really Massive Changes in Accounting, Auditing, Reporting and Communicating – The End Of Accounting?

Although I practice as an attorney, I previously practiced as a CPA and I have experienced several times over the years when there were significant changes occurring in the accounting practice and profession. But right now, I believe that I am witnessing multiple massive changes that have been long in the making. The following is a link to an Accounting Today article which does a pretty good job of discussing some of the changes, and also includes a question whether this is the end of accounting – click on the following link, CLICK HERE

It’s not like these changes are screaming at you in the headlines, but the cumulative effect is significant, new changes are continuing and will continue, and perhaps more important, the reasons for the changes are permanent.

For a long, long time the value of the audit and of the audit report have been questioned.

For a long, long time, the value of the information provided by an accounting that is prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles has been questioned.

Different stakeholders also have different needs, and speed at which the flow of information is needed and expected is ever-increasing. Audited financial statements, for example, don’t tell you very much about the future investment or business generating value of the entity or of the transactions reported, or of the risks that are associated.

So now, for example, in addition to GAAP accounting we have non-GAAP accounting and reporting, we are seeing an increased ability to audit all transactions by computer software, GAAP is moving from the more detailed and specific rules based approach back to the more principles based approach that was in place when I first became a CPA, and non-GAAP measurements or criteria are becoming or should become more important such as some of the governance criteria (integrity, tone-at-the-top, culture, etc.), sustainability, transparency, risk management, and more emphasis on internal controls such as COSO.

However, I don’t agree with the suggestion or question in the title to the above linked article – it’s not the end of accounting. Traditional accounting serves a useful purpose – can you imagine what a free for all it would be without traditional accounting? There would be absolutely no checks or balances. There would be a “zero” reliability factor, and no comparability between different entities or industries.

But there is no question that the changes that have occurred and that continue to occur in accounting and auditing create both opportunities and risks for investors, financial institutions and other stakeholders, executive, financial, accounting and audit officers and professionals, boards, and audit and risk committees. The people who will excel are the people who will embrace and become expert in these changes. It’s a lifetime of learning to stay ahead and relevant.

Best to you. Dave Tate, Esq.

The following is a link to my Tate’s Excellent Audit Committee Guide, updated January 2016, CLICK HERE

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